Shortcuts
Please wait while page loads.

Library catalogue

Back to library home


PageMenu- Main Menu-
Page content

Catalogue Display

Recognise what? : arguments to acknowledge Aborigines, but not recognise Aboriginal culture or rights, in the Australian Constitution / edited by Gary Johns.

Recognise what? : arguments to acknowledge Aborigines, but not recognise Aboriginal culture or rights, in the Australian Constitution / edited by Gary Johns.
Catalogue Information
Field name Details
ISBN 9781925138238 (paperback)
Title Recognise what? : arguments to acknowledge Aborigines, but not recognise Aboriginal culture or rights, in the Australian Constitution / edited by Gary Johns.
Publisher &/or associated date/s Ballarat, VIC : Connor Court Publishing, [2014].
©2014
Description xxi, 118 pages ; 21 cm.
Contents Foreword -- Introduction -- Questioning Aboriginal culture -- 1. Ron Brunton - Myths of cultural continuity -- 2. Alistair Crooks - An Aboriginal constitution -- Recognition is not reconciliation -- 3. James Allan - Recognition hands power to judges -- 4. Gary Johns - Already recognition enough -- 5. Bryan Pape - Cosmetic preamble an irrelevant adornment -- A lot could, and will, go wrong -- 6. Wesley Aird - Recognition is blackfella politics -- 7. Anthony Dillon - Recognition may mean never closing the gap -- 8. Kerryn Pholi - Upsetting the intermarriage applecart -- 9. Frank Salter - Six recognition traps -- 10. Dallas Scott - Fighting a war already won -- International follies -- 11. Tom Flanagan - Constitutionalising Canadian Aboriginal rights -- 12. David Round - Neo-tribal elites want more from New Zealanders -- 13. Kerryn Pholi and Gary Johns - Great constitution, shame about the nation - Contributors.
Summary Four Aboriginal writers are worried about proposals for Aboriginal recognition in the Constitution. Australians should read these, and the other distinguished essays in this volume, before they embark on this venture -- Wesley Aird "Anything more than a simple statement of historical fact risks the process being jeopardised by 'blackfella politics.' -- Anthony Dillon "The many thousands of happy, successful Aboriginal people, who are flourishing despite the lack of constitutional recognition of culture, are surely evidence that such recognition is not needed." -- Kerryn Pholi "The inclusion of clauses that pledge 'respect for Aboriginal cultures, languages and heritage' ... could create conditions in which a person with a long-ago Aboriginal ancestor may ... find it legally advantageous to cultivate a claim of Aboriginal identity." -- Dallas Scott "Constitutional recognition is an exercise in futility. Unlike the resounding result achieved in 1967 that allowed native Australians to be counted in the Census, and to have laws made on their behalf, there is no urgency or importance attached to the present undertaking."
Subjects Constitutional law -- Australia
Aboriginal Australians -- Civil rights
Referendum -- Australia
Aboriginal Australians -- Legal status, laws, etc
Aboriginal Australians -- Government policy
Other Authors &/or Associated Persons Johns, Gary (editor.)
Call number 342.9402 REC
Catalogue Information 100065991 Beginning of record . Catalogue Information 100065991 Top of page .
Item Information
Barcode Shelf Location Collection Volume Ref. Status Due Date
A00858004 342.9402 REC
General Collection   . Available to Museum Staff .  
. Catalogue Record 100065991 ItemInfo Beginning of record . Catalogue Record 100065991 ItemInfo Top of page .